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Innovative and Applied Emerging Technologies in Biospecimen Science

For a description of the Innovative and Applied Emerging Technologies in Biospecimen Science program, click here.

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has developed solicitations for "Innovative and Applied Emerging Technologies in Biospecimen Science" that are centered on the development of novel sample quality focused technologies that are suitable for molecular analyses of cancer cells and their host environments.

Innovative and Early-Stage Development of Emerging Technologies in Biospecimen Science

RFA: RFA-CA14-005
Award type: RPG
Funding Mechanism: R21
Required: Innovation of technology/approach1; Quantitative milestone2
Not required: Preliminary data

 

Validation and Advanced Development of Emerging Technologies in Biospecimen Science

RFA: RFA-CA14-006
Award type: RPG
Funding Mechanism: R33
Required: Feasibility data3

 

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) invites applications for research projects involving the development and significant enhancement or adaptation of sample preparation methodologies and technologies, the development of assays to assess sample quality, and studies designed to elucidate the criteria by which to judge sample quality. The outcome will be products and methods designed to optimize sample utility. Samples may originate from residual material not necessary for patient care or from cell lines, model organisms, or other sources relevant to cancer research.

The development of new and/or improved cancer sample preparation methodologies and technologies, the development of assays to assess sample quality, and studies to elucidate the criteria needed to judge sample quality covers a wide range of project sizes and innovation levels. These RFAs will allow the submission of applications involving R21 and R33 mechanisms. R21 applicants may propose small, highly innovative feasibility studies or small, short-term exploratory studies to meet one of the RFA goals. Projects for which feasibility has already been established may be proposed as R33 applications. Feasibility means that some preliminary experiments have been performed and that there is sufficient technical data to support proof-of-principle of the technology/hypothesis. If a prior R21 was awarded, the applicant must demonstrate how each of the self-imposed quantitative milestones from the Notice of Grant Award were met. If there was no prior R21 award, the applicant should demonstrate a similar justification for establishing the feasibility of the technology.


1While no preliminary data are necessary, the applicants must demonstrate the innovative nature of the particular technology or approach proposed for development.

2Quantitative milestones for each specific aim must be provided as a way of determining during the project and at its completion whether an applicant has successfully reached the specified goal. Milestones should be clearly stated as numerical quantitative specifications for relevant measures/properties.

3Detailed preliminary data must be provided in support of the feasibility of the technology or approach that is proposed for development. Such data may reflect successful completion of Phase I and associated milestones. For SBIR/STTR FOAs, feasibility data need to be largely obtained through a NIH-sponsored Phase I project.